How Industry 4.0 and 5G Will Change Supply Chain Visibility


liu, tempo Date: 2021-09-03 14:00:59 From:ozmca.com
Views:51 Reply:0

With 5G capabilities, global supply chains will not only be able to provide this enhanced visibility for better cost savings, customer experience and customer retention, but also operate at maximum efficiency speeds.

 

With the epidemic highlighting serious efficiency shortfalls within the supply chain, it is more important than ever for companies to implement, real-time data-driven technologies as part of their supply chain strategy. However, the adoption of these technologies is still slower than needed for current demand, and many supply chains still rely on a black box approach, where passive data loggers collect information about shipments and require a manual process to capture the data. This approach provides insight only after a supply chain problem has occurred, such as a temperature excursion due to a cold chain failure.

 

To address this issue, supply chain organizations are moving toward Industry 4.0 initiatives such as the widespread adoption of 5G and sophisticated IoT sensors to enable real-time insight into the location and condition of each product at the unit level. In fact, 81% of supply chain manufacturers expect to adopt 5G within the next five years.

 

Paving the way for supply chain visualization with Industry 4.0

 

Prior to the outbreak, personal protective equipment (PPE) in the healthcare industry was not being tracked effectively in the supply chain. Manufacturers of PPE and their customers did not know the custody, location or condition of their products throughout the transportation process. This lack of visibility was highlighted during the outbreak as demand for PPE inside and outside of hospitals quickly outpaced supply, and challenged manufacturers to produce enough to keep pace. This, in turn, accelerated the adoption of digital technology by manufacturers. However, these advances often do not include real-time tracking capabilities, which become critical during an epidemic as conditions are constantly changing.

 

Historically, supply chain technologies have tended to operate on somewhat “stale data.” In other words, by the time a manufacturer or customer receives information, the reported location and condition of the product is no longer accurate. The advent of Industry 4.0, and the use of low-cost sensors, provides the opportunity to digitally track products in true real-time rather than near real-time. As a result, manufacturers and customers alike can track location and condition. This is particularly valuable for medical products such as New Crown vaccine vials, which are heavily regulated, often with strict temperature requirements that must be consistent from production to administration to patients.

 

Real-time supply chain visibility can be taken a step further by predicting environmental excursions that may occur as goods move through the transportation process. This leads to operational efficiencies that can mitigate costs and drive the overall smooth operation of the supply chain. For example, real-time supply chain visibility eliminates the need for manufacturers and customers to wait until a shipment reaches its destination to discover that a product or part of a product has deteriorated in transit. Instead, companies can know that a product is at risk of spoiling in transit and address the issue or reroute the product to a closer destination to protect quality and efficacy.

 

The role of 5G and IoT in supply chain visibility

 

The adoption of real-time data and real-time visibility in the global supply chain has accelerated rapidly due to the importance of transporting products, especially in the case of the new vaccine crown. 5G has not yet been widely rolled out or adopted, so manufacturers have yet to experience the full benefits of 5G. But as it becomes widespread, 5G is expected to play a key role in taking supply chain visibility to the next level, becoming a critical tool to help companies view and share their supply chain insights in real time.

 

In terms of IoT, the supply chain industry is experiencing a dramatic rise in IoT sensor and device capabilities to address key supply chain challenges. For example, wireless updates can be done remotely, and manufacturers can now determine in real time the type of data they want to capture, such as their real-time location and temperature.

 

The increase in IoT applications is also enabling companies to track new types of leading indicators to gain valuable insights. These include shocks due to dropped containers, or ambient light to sense if a product has been damaged or left in the sun too long. If this happens, manufacturers can cancel shipments and immediately notify customers of delayed orders, advancing transparency and communication and ultimately improving the customer service experience. In addition, manufacturers will be able to save money by avoiding having to pay for the entire shipment and return it once it reaches the customer’s destination. As a result, this allows manufacturers and customers to avoid product spoilage, product loss, and improved customer experience and retention.

 

Industry 4.0

 

How Industry 4.0 and 5G Will Change Supply Chain Visibility

 

With 5G capabilities, global supply chains will not only be able to provide this enhanced visibility for better cost savings, customer experience and customer retention, but also operate at maximum efficiency speeds.

 

With the epidemic highlighting serious efficiency shortfalls within the supply chain, it is more important than ever for companies to implement, real-time data-driven technologies as part of their supply chain strategy. However, the adoption of these technologies is still slower than needed for current demand, and many supply chains still rely on a black box approach, where passive data loggers collect information about shipments and require a manual process to capture the data. This approach provides insight only after a supply chain problem has occurred, such as a temperature excursion due to a cold chain failure.

 

To address this issue, supply chain organizations are moving toward Industry 4.0 initiatives such as the widespread adoption of 5G and sophisticated IoT sensors to enable real-time insight into the location and condition of each product at the unit level. In fact, 81% of supply chain manufacturers expect to adopt 5G within the next five years.

 

Paving the way for supply chain visualization with Industry 4.0

 

Prior to the outbreak, personal protective equipment (PPE) in the healthcare industry was not being tracked effectively in the supply chain. Manufacturers of PPE and their customers did not know the custody, location or condition of their products throughout the transportation process. This lack of visibility was highlighted during the outbreak as demand for PPE inside and outside of hospitals quickly outpaced supply, and challenged manufacturers to produce enough to keep pace. This, in turn, accelerated the adoption of digital technology by manufacturers. However, these advances often do not include real-time tracking capabilities, which become critical during an epidemic as conditions are constantly changing.

 

Historically, supply chain technologies have tended to operate on somewhat “stale data.” In other words, by the time a manufacturer or customer receives information, the reported location and condition of the product is no longer accurate. The advent of Industry 4.0, and the use of low-cost sensors, provides the opportunity to digitally track products in true real-time rather than near real-time. As a result, manufacturers and customers alike can track location and condition. This is particularly valuable for medical products such as New Crown vaccine vials, which are heavily regulated, often with strict temperature requirements that must be consistent from production to administration to patients.

 

Real-time supply chain visibility can be taken a step further by predicting environmental excursions that may occur as goods move through the transportation process. This leads to operational efficiencies that can mitigate costs and drive the overall smooth operation of the supply chain. For example, real-time supply chain visibility eliminates the need for manufacturers and customers to wait until a shipment reaches its destination to discover that a product or part of a product has deteriorated in transit. Instead, companies can know that a product is at risk of spoiling in transit and address the issue or reroute the product to a closer destination to protect quality and efficacy.

 

The role of 5G and IoT in supply chain visibility

 

The adoption of real-time data and real-time visibility in the global supply chain has accelerated rapidly due to the importance of transporting products, especially in the case of the new vaccine crown. 5G has not yet been widely rolled out or adopted, so manufacturers have yet to experience the full benefits of 5G. But as it becomes widespread, 5G is expected to play a key role in taking supply chain visibility to the next level, becoming a critical tool to help companies view and share their supply chain insights in real time.

 

In terms of IoT, the supply chain industry is experiencing a dramatic rise in IoT sensor and device capabilities to address key supply chain challenges. For example, wireless updates can be done remotely, and manufacturers can now determine in real time the type of data they want to capture, such as their real-time location and temperature.

 

The increase in IoT applications is also enabling companies to track new types of leading indicators to gain valuable insights. These include shocks due to dropped containers, or ambient light to sense if a product has been damaged or left in the sun too long. If this happens, manufacturers can cancel shipments and immediately notify customers of delayed orders, advancing transparency and communication and ultimately improving the customer service experience. In addition, manufacturers will be able to save money by avoiding having to pay for the entire shipment and return it once it reaches the customer’s destination. As a result, this allows manufacturers and customers to avoid product spoilage, product loss, and improved customer experience and retention.

 

5G in action

 

5G capabilities will enable improved bandwidth for computer vision-enabled cameras to support quality control practices during manufacturing and shipping. With the support of 5G connectivity, cameras can perform 3D visual assessment of products and evaluate them based on the characteristics of the The visual assessment of the product and, based on the algorithms associated with the processing, any defects can be identified. This information can be used to improve the proactivity and efficiency of supply chain processes. In addition, next-generation smart appliances, such as refrigerators, washers and dryers, will have sensors built in from the point of manufacture to help locate individual products within warehouses and distribution centers. These sensors will be connected to 5G networks in the warehouse to improve the accuracy of detecting product locations and enable accurate inventory counts.

 

Taking advantage of Industry 4.0, manufacturing facilities can seamlessly monitor the health and condition of their manufacturing equipment to ensure they are being utilized as planned. Any deviation from the plan can be detected immediately and, in most cases, before the problem leads to machine failure. IoT sensors monitoring the equipment will alert any defects and can initiate remediation procedures to check for spare parts in the manufacturer’s inventory. Where feasible, suppliers can submit work orders, order and install new parts, and schedule machine downtime without disrupting the production line’s schedule. 5G speed will provide communication between suppliers, manufacturers and customers, allowing information to be disseminated in real time over a secure, trusted network.

 

In addition, 5G will enhance the daily work experience of warehouse operators. For example, if a warehouse is enabled with a 5G network to support virtual recognition or augmented reality (AR) capabilities, operators can be guided by AR-driven instructions on which goods or products need to be picked to fulfill a particular order. In addition to speeding up supply chain processes, this allows for more data to be processed during production uptime, therefore generating more real-time insights.

 

The future of a 5G-enabled global supply chain

 

As we continue to move toward a post-panoptic world, visibility remains critical to the supply chain industry’s Industry 4.0 digital transformation. With 5G capabilities, global supply chains will not only be able to provide this enhanced visibility for better cost savings, customer experience and customer retention, but also operate at maximum efficiency speeds.

 

5G in action

 

5G capabilities will enable improved bandwidth for computer vision-enabled cameras to support quality control practices during manufacturing and shipping. With the support of 5G connectivity, cameras can perform 3D visual assessment of products and evaluate them based on the characteristics of the The visual assessment of the product and, based on the algorithms associated with the processing, any defects can be identified. This information can be used to improve the proactivity and efficiency of supply chain processes. In addition, next-generation smart appliances, such as refrigerators, washers and dryers, will have sensors built in from the point of manufacture to help locate individual products within warehouses and distribution centers. These sensors will be connected to 5G networks in the warehouse to improve the accuracy of detecting product locations and enable accurate inventory counts.

 

Taking advantage of Industry 4.0, manufacturing facilities can seamlessly monitor the health and condition of their manufacturing equipment to ensure they are being utilized as planned. Any deviation from the plan can be detected immediately and, in most cases, before the problem leads to machine failure. IoT sensors monitoring the equipment will alert any defects and can initiate remediation procedures to check for spare parts in the manufacturer’s inventory. Where feasible, suppliers can submit work orders, order and install new parts, and schedule machine downtime without disrupting the production line’s schedule. 5G speed will provide communication between suppliers, manufacturers and customers, allowing information to be disseminated in real time over a secure, trusted network.

 

In addition, 5G will enhance the daily work experience of warehouse operators. For example, if a warehouse is enabled with a 5G network to support virtual recognition or augmented reality (AR) capabilities, operators can be guided by AR-driven instructions on which goods or products need to be picked to fulfill a particular order. In addition to speeding up supply chain processes, this allows for more data to be processed during production uptime, therefore generating more real-time insights.

 

The future of a 5G-enabled global supply chain

 

As we continue to move toward a post-panoptic world, visibility remains critical to the supply chain industry’s Industry 4.0 digital transformation. With 5G capabilities, global supply chains will not only be able to provide this enhanced visibility for better cost savings, customer experience and customer retention, but also operate at maximum efficiency speeds.

Leave a comment

You must Register or Login to post a comment.